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News Release

ETA News Release: [01/29/2010]
Contact Name: Lina Garcia or Mike Trupo
Phone Number: (202) 693-4661 or x3414
Release Number: 10-0115-NAT

US Department of Labor calls on states to apply for unemployment insurance modernization funding

More than $4 billion remains unclaimed

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Labor today called on states to apply for more than $4 billion in unemployment insurance modernization funding made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) for those states that expand access to unemployment benefits. These funds can be used by states to pay unemployment insurance benefits and may be used for other defined purposes if appropriated by state legislatures.

"Many states already have made the choice and updated their laws to reflect the changing needs of the nation's unemployed," said Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis. "Those states that have not yet applied for funding should take this opportunity to assist the millions of individuals who are out of work through no fault of their own and who are in great need of assistance."

The Assistance for Unemployed Workers and Struggling Families Act — enacted as part of the Recovery Act on Feb. 17, 2009 — provides for a special distribution of $7 billion in unemployment compensation modernization incentive payments to states. A state must make an application to the Department of Labor demonstrating that state laws contain certain benefit eligibility provisions.

Currently, in some states, fewer than three out of 10 jobless workers qualify for unemployment benefits due, in part, to eligibility restrictions in state laws. Unemployment modernization provisions allow an expanded group of workers — including recent entrants to the labor force, low-wage workers, part-time workers and individuals unemployed as a result of family circumstances — to be eligible for unemployment benefits.

Unemployment modernization funds can be used to pay unemployment compensation benefits, and in some instances, may lessen the need of states to borrow money from the federal government. Unemployment modernization payments are not loans and do not need to be paid back. As of today, a total of $2,845,024,070 in incentive payments has been disbursed to 32 states. The amount remaining is $4,154,975,930.

Visit http://wdr.doleta.gov/directives/corr_doc.cfm?DOCN=2851 to read the guidance issued to states and visit http://www.dol.gov/recovery/map/map-ui-modernization.htm to view a chart detailing which states have received unemployment modernization funding. For more information on the Department of Labor's employment and training programs, visit http://www.doleta.gov.

News Release

ETA News Release: [01/29/2010]
Contact Name: Lina Garcia or Mike Trupo
Phone Number: (202) 693-4661 or x3414
Release Number: 10-0115-NAT

US Department of Labor calls on states to apply for unemployment insurance modernization funding

More than $4 billion remains unclaimed

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Labor today called on states to apply for more than $4 billion in unemployment insurance modernization funding made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) for those states that expand access to unemployment benefits. These funds can be used by states to pay unemployment insurance benefits and may be used for other defined purposes if appropriated by state legislatures.

"Many states already have made the choice and updated their laws to reflect the changing needs of the nation's unemployed," said Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis. "Those states that have not yet applied for funding should take this opportunity to assist the millions of individuals who are out of work through no fault of their own and who are in great need of assistance."

The Assistance for Unemployed Workers and Struggling Families Act — enacted as part of the Recovery Act on Feb. 17, 2009 — provides for a special distribution of $7 billion in unemployment compensation modernization incentive payments to states. A state must make an application to the Department of Labor demonstrating that state laws contain certain benefit eligibility provisions.

Currently, in some states, fewer than three out of 10 jobless workers qualify for unemployment benefits due, in part, to eligibility restrictions in state laws. Unemployment modernization provisions allow an expanded group of workers — including recent entrants to the labor force, low-wage workers, part-time workers and individuals unemployed as a result of family circumstances — to be eligible for unemployment benefits.

Unemployment modernization funds can be used to pay unemployment compensation benefits, and in some instances, may lessen the need of states to borrow money from the federal government. Unemployment modernization payments are not loans and do not need to be paid back. As of today, a total of $2,845,024,070 in incentive payments has been disbursed to 32 states. The amount remaining is $4,154,975,930.

Visit http://wdr.doleta.gov/directives/corr_doc.cfm?DOCN=2851 to read the guidance issued to states and visit http://www.dol.gov/recovery/map/map-ui-modernization.htm to view a chart detailing which states have received unemployment modernization funding. For more information on the Department of Labor's employment and training programs, visit http://www.doleta.gov.

News Release

ETA News Release: [01/29/2010]
Contact Name: Lina Garcia or Mike Trupo
Phone Number: (202) 693-4661 or x3414
Release Number: 10-0124-NAT

US Department of Labor awards $225 million to Senior Community Service Employment Program grantees

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Labor today announced $225 million in additional funding for the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) in fiscal year 2010. This funding was provided in the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2010 to allow SCSEP grantees to immediately address unmet needs for employment and job training among low-income, older American workers.

"This additional funding greatly expands SCSEP's ability to serve older workers who face challenges in re-entering the workforce and attaining economic stability," said Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis. "The U.S. Department of Labor is committed to expanding employment opportunities to even more low-income seniors and to enhancing their own career opportunities as they dedicate millions of hours to nonprofit and civic organizations."

This additional funding is a much needed opportunity for high-performing grantees to serve unemployed, low-income seniors. Successful applicants were chosen based on demonstrated need among the older worker populations they serve; the capacity to immediately and effectively expend the additional funds; and past performance in serving older workers.

SCSEP is a community service and work-based training program for older workers. It provides part-time, community service-based job training for unemployed, low-income individuals age 55 or older. Through this program, older workers have access to SCSEP services as well as other employment assistance available through the workforce investment system.

Editor's Note: A list of states and organizations that have been awarded funding is below.


Senior Community Service Employment Program grantees

Grantee

Funding Amount

Alabama

$824,520

Alaska

$300,000

Arizona

$657,582

Arkansas

$645,921

California

$4,239,993

Connecticut

$540,589

Delaware

$940,000

District of Columbia

$286,431

Florida

$2,916,761

Georgia

$1,097,315

Hawaii

$610,000

Idaho

$263,152

Illinois

$1,859,350

Indiana

$1,294,993

Iowa

$439,776

Kentucky

$451,164

Massachusetts

$1,077,144

Michigan

$1,100,000

Minnesota

$1,126,942

Missouri

$1,086,800

Montana

$280,000

Nebraska

$330,000

Nevada

$263,152

New Hampshire

$263,152

New Jersey

$1,395,850

New Mexico

$278,363

New York

$2,049,113

North Carolina

$907,038

North Dakota

$265,422

Ohio

$2,158,322

Oregon

$400,000

Pennsylvania

$754,230

Rhode Island

$266,260

South Carolina

$673,719

South Dakota

$335,000

Texas

$2,743,288

Utah

$330,808

Virginia

$1,073,110

Washington

$649,210

Wisconsin

$1,266,754

AARP Foundation

$37,873,312

National Able

$3,188,511

Asociacion Nacional Pro Personas Mayores

$4,705,414

Easter Seals

$9,158,174

Experience Works

$49,405,014

Goodwill

$4,644,862

Mature Services

$2,844,985

National Caucus on Black Aged

$7,508,788

National Coalition on Aging

$14,511,583

National Urban League

$4,810,050

Quality Career Services

$746,977

SER Jobs for Progress

$13,743,000

Senior Service America

$28,674,012

The Workplace Inc.

$230,000

Vermont Associates for Training and Development

$1,058,111

Institute for Indian Development

$545,680

National Asian Pacific Center on Aging

$2,910,300

This is a blog post by Diane Wood of the Office of Unemployment Insurance, Employment and Training Administration.

Would you like to learn about a new initiative that 34 states have implemented to monitor UI claimant eligibility and help UI claimants return to work?. Then, you will want to learn more about the Re-employment and Eligibility Assessment (REA) initiative that has brought large numbers of UI claimants into the One-Stop Career Center to learn about available services.  Please review our Webinar at http://www.workforce3one.org/view/5001002247077825152/info

The Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (REA) initiative began in 2005 when 21 states got grants to focus additional attention on claimants.  Many claimants filed their UI claim over the telephone or the Internet and might not have been aware of the many re-employment services that were available to them at their local One-Stop Career Center.  The REA grants provided funds for staff to serve those claimants when they reported to the office in-person.  During the REA staff members review claimants’ availability for work and their recent work search activities.  They then provide labor market information that is geared towards the work that each individual is seeking.  Finally they introduce them to the plethora of available re-employment services including both staff assisted services and self service opportunities.  The REA program is designed to get claimants back to work and to reduce erroneous payments.

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